MEMORIALS

JANUARY 18, 2016

SPEECH FOR MLK DAY

Hello, everyone. My name is Beth Gilbert. I am 21 years old – and I am a Wilkes-Barre City Councilwoman. As a young woman in Pennsylvania, it might be unexpected to say that Martin Luther King inspired a great deal of my actions. In my personal life, and my professional life, Martin Luther King’s words, actions, humility, and perseverance have left a lasting impression.
    Martin Luther King was a catalyst for change. At his deepest roots, Martin Luther King was a community organizer, a minister, and a father. King simply used his voice in whatever way possible to inspire change in others. That, my friends, is a lesson we can all learn. Now, especially in the twenty-first century, all of us, particularly women, wear many hats. We are partners, wives, mothers, sisters, teachers, aunts, CEOs, community organizers, students, entrepreneurs, doctors, politicians, leaders, bosses, the list goes on. So, what can WE learn from Dr. Martin Luther King? We can learn to use our resources, our positions, and our voices to help others and inspire change. 
Last year, as a 20-year-old student, I think it is safe to say that not many people expected me to seek a seat on the Wilkes-Barre City Council. During the time preceding my decision to run for office, I engaged in a lot of inward reflection and debate. I did a critical mental analysis, which included overwhelmingly basic questions – Why am I doing this? If I run, will I be choosing to do such for the right reasons? 
During this reflection, there were several key people, well known and unknown, who played a significant role in my decision. Around this time last year, the movie Selma came out, and I am sure you are all aware of the main plot of the film. One of the underlying themes of the movie and of the real life Selma March, was to provoke change in whatever way possible. This is the reason Martin Luther King inspired me to run for office – against any odds that might not be in my favor. I knew I might be wildly unpopular because of my age, and sadly, in the twenty-first century, because I am a woman. Martin Luther King, posthumously, encouraged me to run by making me unafraid of failure. 
    Martin Luther King has taught me to do what I know is right in my heart – regardless of who stands with you, or who stands against you.  I like to believe that our actions are measured not by success, but by willingness to take action at all. I think that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would agree with this statement.
    With all of this being said, I hope that Dr. Martin Luther King inspires you to fail. I hope that Dr. King inspires you to be a catalyst for change – in whatever way you possibly can. I hope that you use your voice to represent those who do not have a voice. Lastly, I hope that you always do what is right in your heart – REGARDLESS of who, or what, stands with you, or against you.

Thank you, and God Bless.

MAY 20, 2016

 

I am honored to have attended the Wilkes-Barre City Police Peace Officers Memorial Service. This service honored past officers, current officers, and families of the officers. A beautiful day for a beautiful ceremony.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

 

I am humbled to have marched and stood with community leaders yesterday afternoon in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery, Alabama civil rights marches. We have come a long way from those marches fifty years ago, but we still have a long way to go, even here in this valley. 
I encourage each of you to stand for justice not only for disadvantaged groups, but also for our law enforcement officers who risk their lives to protect us every day. I encourage each of you to show those who preach hatred that we stand together as one community here in Wilkes-Barre. As Larry Singleton, president of the NAACP, stated yesterday, "Hate has no place in our community."

Photo courtesy of Andrew Krech, The Citizen's Voice.m a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

MEMORIALS

MAY 20, 2016

 

I am honored to have attended the Wilkes-Barre City Police Peace Officers Memorial Service. This service honored past officers, current officers, and families of the officers. A beautiful day for a beautiful ceremony.

JANUARY 18, 2016

SPEECH FOR MLK DAY

Hello, everyone. My name is Beth Gilbert. I am 21 years old – and I am a Wilkes-Barre City Councilwoman. As a young woman in Pennsylvania, it might be unexpected to say that Martin Luther King inspired a great deal of my actions. In my personal life, and my professional life, Martin Luther King’s words, actions, humility, and perseverance have left a lasting impression.
    Martin Luther King was a catalyst for change. At his deepest roots, Martin Luther King was a community organizer, a minister, and a father. King simply used his voice in whatever way possible to inspire change in others. That, my friends, is a lesson we can all learn. Now, especially in the twenty-first century, all of us, particularly women, wear many hats. We are partners, wives, mothers, sisters, teachers, aunts, CEOs, community organizers, students, entrepreneurs, doctors, politicians, leaders, bosses, the list goes on. So, what can WE learn from Dr. Martin Luther King? We can learn to use our resources, our positions, and our voices to help others and inspire change. 
Last year, as a 20-year-old student, I think it is safe to say that not many people expected me to seek a seat on the Wilkes-Barre City Council. During the time preceding my decision to run for office, I engaged in a lot of inward reflection and debate. I did a critical mental analysis, which included overwhelmingly basic questions – Why am I doing this? If I run, will I be choosing to do such for the right reasons? 
During this reflection, there were several key people, well known and unknown, who played a significant role in my decision. Around this time last year, the movie Selma came out, and I am sure you are all aware of the main plot of the film. One of the underlying themes of the movie and of the real life Selma March, was to provoke change in whatever way possible. This is the reason Martin Luther King inspired me to run for office – against any odds that might not be in my favor. I knew I might be wildly unpopular because of my age, and sadly, in the twenty-first century, because I am a woman. Martin Luther King, posthumously, encouraged me to run by making me unafraid of failure. 
    Martin Luther King has taught me to do what I know is right in my heart – regardless of who stands with you, or who stands against you.  I like to believe that our actions are measured not by success, but by willingness to take action at all. I think that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would agree with this statement.
    With all of this being said, I hope that Dr. Martin Luther King inspires you to fail. I hope that Dr. King inspires you to be a catalyst for change – in whatever way you possibly can. I hope that you use your voice to represent those who do not have a voice. Lastly, I hope that you always do what is right in your heart –
REGARDLESS of who, or what, stands with you, or against you.

Thank you, and God Bless.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

 

I am humbled to have marched and stood with community leaders yesterday afternoon in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery, Alabama civil rights marches. We have come a long way from those marches fifty years ago, but we still have a long way to go, even here in this valley. 
I encourage each of you to stand for justice not only for disadvantaged groups, but also for our law enforcement officers who risk their lives to protect us every day. I encourage each of you to show those who preach hatred that we stand together as one community here in Wilkes-Barre. As Larry Singleton, president of the NAACP, stated yesterday, "Hate has no place in our community."

Photo courtesy of Andrew Krech, The Citizen's Voice.com

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